Pamukkale-Turkish Cotton Castle

Pamukkale-Turkish Cotton Castle

Pamukkalemeaning “cotton castle” in Turkish, is a natural site in Denizli in southwestern Turkey. Today, it is a famous Turkish attraction. What makes this place special is a termal water, unique natural shape and ancient ruins of the city. The ancient Romans discover this place and builded a famous city upon it, where they would come to heal themselves, recover or even die.

Origin of white color

Somewhere deep in the earth beneath Pamukkale and the ancient Roman city of Hierapolis lies a vast source of water heated by volcanic lava. The water dissolves pure white calcium, becomes saturated with it, and carries it to the earth’s surface, where it bursts forth and runs down a steep hillside.

Cooling in the open air, the calcium precipitates from the water, adheres to the soil, and forms white calcium “cascades” frozen in stone called travertines.

In this area, there are 17 hot water springs in which the temperature ranges from 35 °C (95 °F) to 100 °C (212 °F). The water that emerges from the spring is transported 320 metres (1,050 ft) to the head of the travertine terraces and deposits calcium carbonate on a section 60 to 70 metres (200 to 230 ft) long covering an expanse of 24 metres (79 ft) to 30 metres (98 ft).

History

Located in the province of Denizli, this extraordinary landscape was a focus of interest for visitors to the nearby Hellenistic spa town of Hierapolis, founded by the Attalid kings of Pergamom at the end of the 2nd century B.C., at the site of an ancient cult. Its hot springs were also used for scouring and drying wool. Ceded to Rome in 133 B.C., Hierapolis flourished, reaching its peak of importance in the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D., having been destroyed by an earthquake in 60 A.D. and rebuilt. Remains of the Greco-Roman period include baths, temple ruins, a monumental arch, a nymphaeum, a necropolis and a theatre.

Following the acceptance of Christianity by the emperor Constantine and his establishment of Constantinople as the ‘new Rome’ in 330 A.D., the town was made a bishopric. As the place of St. Philip’s martyrdom in 80 A.D., commemerated by his Martyrium building in the 5th century, Hierapolis with its several churches became an important religious center for the Eastern Roman Empire.

Antiques Pool/Cleopatras Pool

This place was allegedly one of Cleopatras favorite places. This egyptian queen is well known for her beauty and health treatments. This pool consist out of mineral water with temperature from 30 C°-50 C° and its water is good for heart diseases, atherosclerosis, blood pressure, rheumatism, eye and skin diseases, rickets, nervous disorders, nervous and physical exhaustion circulatorly problems and furthermore when it has been drank it is good for digestive maladies.

The pool is open for tourist and You can swimm there during the entire year.

With a unique combination of natural and man-made wonders Pamukkale-Hierapolis has been made a Unesco World Heritage site. With over two million visitors annually, it is also one of the Turkey’s most visited attractions.